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Karst Aquifer Resources availability and quality in the Mediterranean Area (KARMA) - SURVEY

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The KARMA project is a cooperation of (karst)-groundwater scientists from seven countries under the umbrella of the PRIMA initiative . The objective of the KARMA project (2019-2022) is to achieve substantial progress in the hydrogeological understanding and sustainable management of karst groundwater resources in the Mediterranean region in terms of water availability and quality at different scales. The project is coordinated by Prof. Dr. Nico Goldscheider from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany. For more information visit the website: www.karma-project.org In the framework of the project, the KARMA survey is carried out in order to obtain a comprehensive picture of how the regional experts assess the importance of the tools for improved karst groundwater management developed in the KARMA project: • Modeling tools • Vulnerability maps • Early warning systems (EWS) for groundwater contamination • Mediterranean Karst Aquifer Map and database (MEDKAM) Comments and eval

Water cycle 2.

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In the previous post you could read about where the Earth’s water resources can be found and how much time water spends in the spheres. Now, you can find out which natural interactions are responsible for water movement between the different spheres. The Water Cycle Source: https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/fundamentals-water-cycle?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects Water cycle is generated by energy arriving from the Sun. On the extensive free surface of seas and oceans water easily starts to evaporate and get into the atmosphere due to solar radiation. We can see the same process on a smaller scale on the surface of lakes and rivers or ice and snow caps. Not only the physical evaporation but also plants can transport water (mostly shallow groundwater, infiltrating rainwater) to the atmosphere. This is called transpiration . When the air becomes saturated by vapour, water condenses and cloud formation starts. This is usually caused by

Water cycle

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What would we see if we followed a drop of water for a day, a year, or a decade? How many phase transitions would happen? How much time would it spend at the same sphere? Which natural processes would it take part in? To answer these questions, let’s see the water cycle in this post. Water cycle Source: https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/721-the-water-cycle The Earth is a closed hydrological system which means that there’s a constant amount of water on the planet for millions of years. However, water is always in motion . It moves in different phases between the 3 large reservoirs of the Earth: atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere. This one-way periodic circulation is the system of water cycle . The circulation is generated and sustained by the energy from the Sun and it’s based on the principle of minimum energy. In the 3 spheres water is present in different states for different periods of time. The least water, less than 0.01% of the total amount, is stored in the atmosp

SURVEY on lake manager perspectives

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Source: https://www.facebook.com/GLEONetwork/ The “SMAC” research group, part of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (“ GLEON ”) Reservoirs and Lake Management Working Group, has launched a survey on lake manager perspectives regarding the role of science in management. The idea for this project arose from a discussion at a GLEON All Hands’ meeting about wanting to better disseminate science to management organizations in order to support having current, relevant knowledge to be available for protecting our lakes.  As a group of scientists, “SMAC” wants to get insights from their interdisciplinary partners about: the challenges that are impacting lake ecosystem management, the role of science in lake management planning and decision-making, how we can more efficiently communicate in order to effectively collaborate together. Results from the survey will: be published in an open access, peer-reviewed journal and help inform the next phase of the project which is to develop to

COVID-19 impact on research life - SURVEY

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 Source: https://pixabay.com/hu/ The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has posed an enormous challenge to society in terms of health, social matters and employment. Researchers from different fields of knowledge have had to face this challenge in different ways depending on their projects and areas of work. The Gender & Science group of the Iberian Association of Limnology (AIL) and the research group SINTE-Lest, FPCEE Blanquerna, invite you to take this survey to know how the COVID-19 has impacted on your experience as a researcher . The survey is part of the project "Researcher Identity Development RIDSSIS", which aims to study the identity of researchers and the challenges they face in their research activity. The survey can be found here , answering only takes 10 minutes.

A citizen-science assessment of the state of the world’s wetlands - SURVEY

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Do you know a wetland? Wetlands include swamps, marshes, fens, bogs, lakes, rivers, floodplains, estuaries, mangroves, mudflats, coral reefs and lagoons. If you do know a wetland, then you can help. Source: https://chinadialogueocean.net/12925-water-lands-picturing-the-worlds-wetlands-and-their-peoples/ Wetlands across the globe are in danger. Estimates suggest that in some parts of the world wetland losses have been as high as 87% since 1700. The loss and degradation of wetland causes impacts on human well-being and wildlife alike. The World Wetland Network ( www.worldwetnet.org [1]), the Ramsar Section of the Society of Wetland Scientists ( www.sws.org [2]), the Cobra Collective ( www.cobracollective.org [3]) and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) ( www.iucn.org [4]) have come together to gather and evaluate information from across the world and to lead a global assessment based on ‘citizen-science’ on the state of wetlands. This is a repeat of the 2017 su

EFFS & The Water Framework Directive

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The European Commission , despite the huge pressures received, has decided not to revise the requirements of the Water Framework Directive . The European Federation for Freshwater Sciences ( EFFS ), through has been collaborating with other societies to support the European Commission in maintaining the environmental requirements of this decisive legal framework to recover the ecological health of European freshwater ecosystems. Source: https://www.wwf.eu/what_we_do/water Visit the following links for further information: http://www.eureau.org/resources/news/456-european-commission-decides-not-to-revise-the-wfd https://www.eaa-europe.org/news/14226/eu-water-law-will-not-be-changed-confirms-european-commission.html https://www.eubusiness.com/Members/WWF/water-law-3 https://www.wwf.eu/what_we_do/water/?uNewsID=357085